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Historic Dartmoor

Lych Way

Lych Way

There is a sinister pathway that winds its sombre way across the northern wastes of Dartmoor, it is known as the ‘Way of the Dead’, the ‘Corpse Way‘, or the Lych Way. Its roots are firmly set deep in the days when every person on the moor was expected to …

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Lost Crosses

Since the first early Christian stone crosses appeared on Dartmoor there has been a constant ebb and flow of their numbers down through the ages. It seems that some disappear whilst other are discovered or rediscovered, one such example of this is the supposed cross head on Three Barrows Hill. …

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Longstone, The

Longstone, The

Shoveldon, Shuggledown, Shuffledown or Shovel Down as the Ordnance Survey insist on recording it is another of Dartmoor’s finest prehistoric landscapes consisting of settlements, field systems, cairns, stone rows, and slap, bang in the centre ‘The Longstone’. When viewed from the south west it is evident by its weary lean …

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Limsboro Cairn

Limsboro Cairn

Just south of Lynch Tor stands a chaotic pile of granite which consists of an outcrop studded and encircled by smaller rocks and boulders, this is Limsboro Cairn. What at first appears to be an insignificant scatter of granite has in fact millennia of history lying back in the annals …

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Leigh Bridge Cross

Leigh Bridge Cross

Just to the west of Chagford the North Teign river it flows past the famous Gidleigh Park and then takes a sudden dive southwards. After it has recovered from this drastic manoeuvre it then flows under an ancient bridge known as ‘Leigh Bridge’. It was across this bridge that the …

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Laughter Tor Cross

Laughter Tor Cross

A I spent most of 1996 visiting, photographing and drawing all the more noted stone crosses of Dartmoor as preparation for my book, it should not be surprising that the subject is near to my heart. Therefore I was excited when I stumbled upon a photograph of a previously undiscovered …

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Laughter Tor Complex

Laughter Tor Complex

One of the biggest travesties as far as Dartmoor archaeology is concerned must be the forestation of the area around Bellever and to a lesser extent, Laughter tor. The forest was planted by the Duchy of Cornwall in 1921 in order to replenish wood supplies and this effectively blanketed about …

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Lakehead Kistvaen

Lakehead Kistvaen

If ever there was a top ten of Dartmoor kistvaens then the number one slot for me would be taken by ‘Kist 14a’ which sits on Lakehead Hill. Whoever was buried here must surely have been a person of high status to command such regal ‘burial furniture’. If anyone has …

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Knattabarrow

When is a barrow not a barrow? Why, when it’s ‘Knatt a Barrow’ of course and this Knatta Barrow sits upon its own hill – Knattaburrow Hill at an altitude of 450 metres. Here we see some typical Dartmoor confusion as various topographical writers refer to a burrow as opposed …

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Kistvaens

Kistvaens

Attempting to even try to explain burial tombs which are around 4,000 years old is virtually impossible and full of modern-day conjectures and beliefs. Clearly the very design of ancient tombs had some significance and meaning to the prehistoric mind but trying to say exactly what is impossible. It has …

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