Dartmoor Hogs Pudding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have heard on occasions that Hog's Pudding is the 'Devonshire haggis' which I find totally incomprehensible. It looks nothing like haggis and it sure as hell tastes nothing like haggis. Granted it is a large sausage and it has some magical ingredients but unlike the haggis they do not live on the moor and aren't shot by the dozen for Burn's night. I have called this page 'Dartmoor Hog's Pudding' but it is by no means exclusive to the moor. However, Martins, the butchers in Okehampton sells the best you will find in Devon. There are also scallywags who will say that Hogs Pudding is a Cornish Tradition, well that as may be but anyone travelling down the A30 will find a Devonshire Hogs Pudding before a Cornish one.

But for breakfast, no forget that, for any meal they are a sumptuous feast full of flavour and texture. They can be a embuggerance to cook especially if you have the heat up too high, then you need a pair of protective goggles - all will be explained:

Hog's Pudding can come in two sorts, there is the type that are filled with meat and spices or there are what I call the 'proper' job which is meat and groats mixed together. The meat can come from two sources, the 'pluck' or heart, lungs, liver etc or pork meat. The mixture is usually stuffed into an ox gut casing and is normally about six inches long with a girth of roughly eight inches, which sounds like something from a Ann Summers party, looks like one too!

I did mention earlier that if you get the pan too hot you are in for a pyroclastic shower of molten groats as they erupt from the fat. Those that hit you in the face are quite painful and tend to cause a certain amount of consternation - tis like cooking popcorn without a lid. Sadly, it's a 'Catch 22' situation because to eat the pudding at its best it needs to slightly split so the groats get 'crusty' which means the hot shower and it is the degree of heat that determines its ferocity. Alternatively they can be cooked in the oven but then you once again might have the 'exploding groat' problem which means cleaning the oven afterwards. 

 

 

Now the above admirably depicts the 'Hog's Pudding Feast', clearly I will never make a living photographing food as this picture does not even begin to do the meal justice. The dish is a modern version of the traditional meal with ingredients coming from all corners of Tesco's.

 

 

 

You will want:

2 x Hog's Puddings per person

1 Tin of Plum Tomatoes

1 x Handful of Fresh Basil

3 x Field Mushrooms or Portobello Mushrooms - out of season, per person

2 x Slices of Stone Ground Bread

1 x Whatever of Potato Jacket Wedges - buy one get one free if poss.

2 x Slices of Pancetta per Hogs Pudding, wrap around each end

1 x Orgasmic, Free Range, Bird Flu Free, Hedgerow Egg per person

1 x Bottle of Sam's Poundhouse Cider to drink whilst cooking, 3 bottles are even better!

3 x Bottles of Finest Merlot for consumption after the cider has gone

1 x Sachet of Resolve for use about 1.00am

2 x Rennie Tablets for use about 1.10am

2 x Aspirins to reduce the risk of heart attack.

 

Method.

1)  Place Potato Jacket Wedges in a pre-heated oven - for 20 minutes or fry in large, hot pan for 15 minutes -

beware of the pyroclastic 'bombs' that will burn an eye out at 20 paces.

2)  Wrap Pancetta around Hog's Pudding - place in oven for 10 minutes

3)  Simmer mushrooms in water for 5 minutes

4)  Mix basil with plum tomatoes and gently boil for 5 minutes

5)  Drizzle oil on stone ground bread and cook in oven for 5 minutes

6)  Gently fry Orgasmic, Free Range, Bird Flu Free Eggs for 3 - 5 minutes

7)  Assemble on pre-heated plate and enjoy with a glass of Devonshire Cider, well best buy six bottles and consume the first five whilst preparing the feast, that way if frying it don't sting so much.

 

Please Note:

If you are going to the 'Fat Club' 'tis best to resign, and please note that it is not only Kensington folk that can drizzle stone ground bread with olive oil, us can do it on Dartmoor as well, except it's Mazola!

 

Trying to find a recipe for Hogs Pudding is about as easy as getting the Queens personal mobile number. The ingredients and methods have always been a closely guarded secret amongst butchers and producers and have been handed down through the generations. Should anyone have such a 'treasure' I would be grateful to share it.

Whoa, the 'treasure' has been found, after years of searching I have finally found the holy grail - a recipe for Hog's Pudding, for full details see this page - A New Recipe for Hog's Pudding.

 

 

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20/06/2010